Maintenance

Both the tenant and the landlord have an obligation to take care of the property and the rental unit.

In your tenancy agreement, you can see if you have a regular maintenance obligation, or whether you have an extended maintenance obligation. This is also where you can find out whether you have the interior maintenance obligation, and whether you have a maintenance account, which you, together with your rent, pay for each month.

  • Interior maintenance obligation

    Your tenancy agreement indicates whether the interior maintenance is the responsibility of either you or the landlord.

    If you have the interior maintenance obligation, it means that you need to make sure that the rental unit's walls, ceilings and woodwork are painted and the floors varnished often enough so that your rental unit is always well-maintained.

    If the landlord has the interior maintenance obligation, you must continuously inform the landlord about any maintenance deficiencies in your rental unit.

    It is generally assumed that a dwelling must be painted approximately every 4-5 years in order to be considered well-maintained.

    Professional assistance

    If you have work performed by professionals, the building superintendent can often give good advice about material and colour choices and help find skilled craftspeople. We always use professional, authorised craftspeople. This provides the best quality, and we encourage you to do the same.

  • Interior maintenance account

    If interior maintenance is the responsibility of the landlord, an internal maintenance account is established.

    If your rental unit has an internal maintenance account, it is indicated in the lease. You pay an amount to this account every month together with your rent. The amount is specified in the Rent Act and regulated each year on 1 January.

    As a starting point, the money is used for internal maintenance. Before you begin, we recommend that you first examine what it says on the account. You must also always remember to contact the property's building superintendent to make sure whether you may use the account for the desired purpose. It is also the building superintendent who must approve the work after it is performed.

    Other maintenance work

    If your rental unit is well-kept, and the balance is greater than three years’ provisions, the money can also be used for other maintenance work. For example, this may be the installation of tiles or the replacement of kitchen countertops or mixer taps.

    Who may perform the work?

    Please be aware that it sometimes can be agreed upon in the lease, that the work may only be carried out by VAT registered craftspeople.

    If you choose to do the work yourself, you can recover reasonable costs for materials. However, you cannot recover your own 'labour costs'.

    When the work is completed, the bills shall be supplied to the landlord. Is the work performed as agreed, we will refund the cost. It is important that you get the landlord to inspect the work and certify the bills as soon as possible. If bills are more than three months old, they cannot be refunded.

    Regular maintenance obligation

    Besides the interior maintenance obligation in the lease, which includes ceiling, floors and woodwork, you can also have a regular or extended maintenance obligation. If you have extended maintenance obligation, this will be indicated in section 11 of your tenancy agreement.

    Otherwise you will have regular maintenance obligation. This means that, in addition to the interior maintenance obligation, it is your obligation to maintain and renew your locks and keys.

    The landlord, on the other hand, is responsible for the maintenance and renewal of the rental unit's installations, such as water and gas pipes, washbasins, toilets, radiator valves, electrical outlets and – provided that the property owns them – the rental unit’s appliances.

    Who pays for maintenance work?

    In the table below you can read whether it is you or the landlord who pays for maintenance tasks depending on which maintenance obligations you have.

    Situation

    Extended maintenance obligation
    (pays)
    General maintenance obligation
    (pays)
    Drains in kitchen and bathroom out to soil stack Tenant Tenant
    Thermostatic valves Tenant Landlord
    Repair of taps and washers Tenant Landlord
    Running cisterns (new washer) Tenant Landlord
    Defective cistern Tenant Landlord
    Replacement of taps Landlord Landlord
    Punctured double-glazing Tenant Landlord
    Broken panes Tenant Landlord
    All locks in the flat Tenant Tenant
    Handles, closing and locking mechanisms for doors and windows: replacement/repair Tenant Tenant
    Plugs and gas taps Tenant Landlord
    Cracked wash basin/toilet bowl Tenant Landlord
    Refrigerator, repair* Tenant Landlord
    Refrigerator, replacement* Landlord Landlord
    Cooker, repair* Tenant Landlord
    Cooker, replacement* Landlord Landlord

     
    *) If the tenant owns the white goods, the tenant must always pay for both replacement and repair.

  • Extended maintenance obligation

    Your tenancy agreement may indicate that you are required to perform additional maintenance beyond painting the walls and varnishing floors in your rental unit. It is commonly referred to as an 'extended maintenance obligation' and means that you have the responsibility to maintain and renew fixtures and installations.

    Your tenancy agreement or its supplement will always indicate exactly what you need to maintain, what things you need to maintain and possibly renew.

    It can, among other things, mean that you will be liable for the replacement or repair of parts of the rental unit, e.g. a mixer tap, a cistern, a kitchen countertop, appliances and double-glazed windows if not maintained when you move.

    Once we have assessed how much of the total expense you must incur, we always take into account the period of time you have lived in the unit, and how well you have maintained it.

    Who pays for maintenance work?

    In the table below you can read whether it is you or the landlord who pays for maintenance tasks depending on which maintenance obligations you have.

    Situation

    Extended maintenance obligation
    (pays)
    General maintenance obligation
    (pays)
    Drains in kitchen and bathroom out to soil stack Tenant Tenant
    Thermostatic valves Tenant Landlord
    Repair of taps and washers Tenant Landlord
    Running cisterns (new washer) Tenant Landlord
    Defective cistern Tenant Landlord
    Replacement of taps Landlord Landlord
    Punctured double-glazing Tenant Landlord
    Broken panes Tenant Landlord
    All locks in the flat Tenant Tenant
    Handles, closing and locking mechanisms for doors and windows: replacement/repair Tenant Tenant
    Plugs and gas taps Tenant Landlord
    Cracked wash basin/toilet bowl Tenant Landlord
    Refrigerator, repair* Tenant Landlord
    Refrigerator, replacement* Landlord Landlord
    Cooker, repair* Tenant Landlord
    Cooker, replacement* Landlord Landlord

     
    *) If the tenant owns the white goods, the tenant must always pay for both replacement and repair.

  • Exterior maintenance obligation

    The exterior maintenance includes all other maintenance than paints, whitening and wallpapering in the rental unit, regardless of whether it is inside or outside the rental unit.

    As a starting point, the landlord has the exterior maintenance obligation unless it is agreed otherwise, for example, extended maintenance duty.

    Typically, it is the property's building superintendent who is responsible for exterior maintenance. If you have any questions about the operation of the property, please feel free to contact the landlord.

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